Thursday, 19 December 2013

Increase Windows 7 Experience Index to Get Highest Score 7.9 Rating

Did you know, Vista and Windows 7 has this useful tool for advanced users called Windows Experience Index to test, benchmark their system and measure the efficiency of your computer’s hardware and softwareperformance based on their configuration and how they work together with each other.
You can access the "Windows Experience Index" tool by clicking the Start orb/button and searching for "windows experience index" and then clicking on Check the Windows Experience Index. or by Pressing Widows Key + Pause or going to System Propertiesby right clicking My Computer.
Here is an example of my PC’s score… (original)
Increase Windows 7 Experience Index to Get Highest Score 7.9 Rating

How to Fake Your Windows Experience Index Score to Get Highest Rating

Now, lets see how to change it manually and get the highest windows experience index score by doing a simple edit in a system file containing your PC’s rating.
Go to C:\ Windows \Performance \WinSAT \DataStore and look for a file named(date) Formal.Assessment (Initial).WinSAT.xml
Increase Windows 7 Experience Index to Get Highest Score 7.9 Rating
Open this file with WordPad and edit your score manually to 7.9 (that’s the max. value). Look for a code like <SystemScore>4.9</SystemScore> and change the current rating to 7.9 and save the file.
Now go to your Windows Experience Index screen again and you will see that your score is now the highest rating ie. 7.9 . You can set it at a lower rate to make it look natural while fooling your friends. See my result after the edit.
Increase Windows 7 Experience Index to Get Highest Score 7.9 Rating
You can click Re-run the assessment to re-analyze your system performance and give you the actual score on that page.
Generally, a higher score/rating means that your computer will perform faster, better than a computer with less base score while performing advanced resource-intensive tasks and running heavy software which require more processing power and system memory.
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